Iroquois Valley joins Will County, IL farm alliance to improve soil health, water quality and local economies

Iroquois Valley signed on to a letter to the editor of the Chicago Tribune in opposition to a proposed airport project. The letter is shared below. The issue was taken up by reporter, Ted Slowik, in the Daily Southtown and Chicago Tribune. Read his response here.

Northeastern Illinois boasts some of the planet’s most  fertile soils. Yet the state of Illinois has spent decades  dismissing farmland’s enduring value by pushing a misguided scheme to build a commercial airport near the village of Peotone. 

The Illinois Department of Transportation has used  threats of eminent domain to acquire — and remove from local property tax rolls — more than 4,100 acres of  farmland. This “airport footprint” is more than four times the size of Chicago’s Loop.  

Our Will County farm community is pleased others are  joining our opposition. On July 11, the Tribune Editorial  Board wrote: “The sooner public officials in Springfield and in Chicago’s southern exurbs admit the folly of the  Peotone project, the sooner that land … can be sold for farmland or dedicated to other uses”.  

The eastern Will County countryside is best suited to serve an economy based around food and agricultural  enterprises. The same goes for southwestern Will County  — where regional planners and county and local  governments want to build warehouse complexes to handle imported goods arriving at an intermodal freight  hub. 

County studies dismiss our world-class renewable resource  as “vacant land.” They claim “the greatest opportunity for  growth” is more concrete, asphalt and rooftops. This mindset has driven regional growth patterns since the  dawn of interstate highways. In recent decades, public services and infrastructure have been stretched over ever  greater distances while the regional population has barely increased.  

We don’t need more sprawl. We need a regional agricultural food, nutrition and conservation business plan that incentivizes farmers to continue producing economic, environmental and social benefits for another 100 years.  

Taxpaying farmers deliver these same “ecosystem services”  free of charge. This is no small matter. Our region’s  agricultural working landscape constitutes a landmass almost six times the size of the city of Chicago.  

The local food movement has exposed the strategic importance of farmland near population centers. Northeastern Illinois needs a regional policy framework  that supports farmers’ access to all markets — whether down the road or around the globe. Let’s work together to  make thriving regional farm and food economies a building block of our public health infrastructure.  — Steve Warrick, Sr., Will County Farm Bureau; Jim  Robbins, Will/South Cook Soil & Water Conservation;  and Dave Miller; Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT

Iroquois Valley recognized as 2021 Best for the World B Corp

Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT, PBC is proud to announce our recognition as a Best for the World B Corp: Governance for 2021. 

This award honors Iroquois Valley for our exemplary governance and commitment to long-term stakeholder-minded business practices. Through the adoption of legal practices that underscore our commitment to more than shareholders, we are ensuring that Iroquois Valley will fulfill our triple-bottom-line mission. 

“Best for the World is a special program for the B Corp community, and we’re thrilled to resume it after pausing the program in 2020 due to COVID-19,” says Juan Pablo Larenas, Executive Director of B Lab Global. “This year’s Best for the World companies are operating at the very top of their class, excelling in creating positive impact for their stakeholders, including their works, communities, customers, and environment. We’re proud of the community of stakeholder-driven businesses we’ve cultivated over the last 15 years; together we’re marching toward our collective vision of an inclusive, equitable, and regenerative economic system for all people and the planet.” 

Best for the World B Corps score in the top 5% of all B Corps on the B Impact Assessment in their corresponding size group. This year, 767 B Corps from over 50 countries were named to the 2021 Best for the World lists, including companies such as Patagonia, TOMS, and Natura. 

Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT, PBC Names Tera Johnson CEO

EVANSTON, IL – Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT, PBC announced today that Tera Johnson will succeed co-founder, David Miller, as Chief Executive Officer effective September 1, 2021. 

David Miller, co-founder. Photo first appeared in Eating Well magazine.

Johnson is the founder of the Food Finance Institute (FFI), a nonprofit organization that provides financial technical assistance to food, beverage, and value-added agriculture enterprises. Miller plans to remain on the Iroquois Valley board and will support Johnson as she assumes responsibilities, in addition to managing special projects. He looks forward to the opportunity to step back from day-to-day operations.

“As I look back on the last fifteen years, I believe we were successful in establishing a deeply rooted organic foothold in a region I characterize as a dead soil monoculture,” Miller shares. “I see Tera building on that organic foundation and going beyond. Under her guidance, we will accelerate our commitment to conservation and diversity–in our investments and in our products and programs.”

Miller, founded Iroquois Valley with his friend and former college roommate, Dr. Stephen Rivard in 2007. Miller has served as CEO since inception. Iroquois Valley is one of the first companies in North America to offer investors direct exposure to a diversified organic farmland portfolio. With independent farmers and ranchers at the heart of its investment strategy, Miller led the company as it grew from one relationship with a farming family on a single property in Iroquois County, Illinois to a $75 million portfolio representing 50 farmer relationships in 15 states.

Iroquois Valley is supported by over 500 investors in 47 states, 25% of whom are non-accredited, retail investors who committed capital after the company’s Regulation A+ offering launched in 2019. Over Miller’s fifteen years as CEO, Iroquois Valley incorporated as a real estate investment trust and public benefit corporation, received recognition as a “Best for the World” certified B Corp, and was consistently named to ImpactAssets’ IA50.

“In a time when the mission of Iroquois Valley is more important than ever,” Johnson says, “I’m humbled and inspired to build on the strong foundation that Dave and his team have built and to lead the team into the next phase of Iroquois Valley.”

Johnson built her career around her mission to create the next generation of environmentally and economically regenerative food and farming businesses. Her work at the helm of FFI saw over 600 people from over 400 organizations throughout the U.S. trained in financial management and business consulting. FFI has provided technical assistance to 230 food, farm, and food system businesses since establishment. FFI is part of the University of Wisconsin System’s Institute for Business & Entrepreneurship. Johnson also launched Edible-Alpha®, a digital resource hub providing actionable insights, training, resources and tools. Her podcast interviews with entrepreneurs, bankers, and investors have been downloaded over 45,000 times, with listeners in all 50 states and eight countries. Johnson is the founder of Simply Tera’s and is the 2017 Extension Chancellor’s Wisconsin Idea Award winner. Johnson is a frequent speaker, teacher and financial consultant to sustainable food and farming businesses, social venture funds and investors.

About Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT, PBC

Iroquois Valley is a regenerative finance company that provides land security and financial products to organic farmers by raising capital from mission-driven investors. Iroquois Valley offers long-term leases, mortgage lending, and operating lines of credit to organic and transitioning farmers and ranchers throughout the United States. The company has equity and debt investment options and works with a large network of financial advisors. www.iroquoisvalley.com

Contact: Claire Mesesan, acting communications director

(847) 859-6645 ext. 702 | cmesesan@iroquoisvalleyfarms.com

Financing organic farmers: opportunity intertwined with a challenge

We are pleased to announce Donna Holmes as our new VP, Investor Relations. She replaces Alex Mackay in this position as Alex has left Iroquois Valley to pursue other opportunities. Donna joins us with more than 15 years of experience in business development and investor relations. Her extensive educational background in law and taxation and her enthusiasm for organic farming make her an invaluable addition to Iroquois Valley. Outside of work, Donna enjoys gardening in her downtown Chicago apartment and cycling along Lake Michigan. To schedule an introductory call with Donna, please email her at invest@iroquoisvalleyfarms.com

Donna has recently been featured in Chicago’s Daily Herald: Business Ledger. Click here to read the article on the Daily Herald’s website or scroll down to read the full article.

When President Biden released his plan to protect and grow the rural economy earlier this year, he called for investing in programs that would help farmers reduce their environmental impact while increasing their productivity, profitability, and ability to sequester carbon from the atmosphere.

The goals that Biden’s plan highlights — carbon sequestration through planting cover crops, increasing farm productivity and resilience, and reducing emissions — are core tenets of regenerative agriculture, a more natural way of farming that we at Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT, a nationally recognized Certified B Corp, are well familiar with. After all, Iroquois Valley and its hundreds of mission-minded investors have been helping small farmers increase their organic and regenerative land holdings for nearly 15 years.

Farming is a volatile industry. Food prices and weather patterns fluctuate. Financing options are equally unpredictable. But our experience shows that organic farming is more predictable, more productive, and more profitable than conventional agriculture methods. Studies by our partners at the Rodale Institute and the Organic Farming Research Foundation, and others have found it’s better for our health, our soil, and the planet.

Yet despite the continual, rapid growth of the $60 billion U.S. organic market, organic land makes up less than 1% of our farmland. In Illinois it’s even less: about 39,000 acres out of 27 million. To Iroquois Valley, our investors, and our farmers, these figures represent a problem but also an opportunity.

For most of Iroquois Valley’s existence, investment opportunities were limited to accredited investors who were willing to make long-term commitments of capital, and to share risk with our farmers. We amassed a roster of hundreds of financial advisers, institutions, and individuals financing dozens of farmers across the country. Yet we realized this exclusivity limited our impact.

In 2019 we opened our portfolio to nonaccredited retail investors. There was a long-standing reason for this: We wanted regular people to also be able to support a healthy farm economy, from the soil to the food to the farmers. We knew there were investors out there who didn’t want to play the stock market and who sought a real connection to what their money supported, in this case, ownership of high-quality American organic farmland.

But we also recognized the business case: protection from market forces, flexibility for long-term investors, more stability in our portfolio, and more muscle to increase our holdings and grow organic farmland across the United States.

We correctly predicted the appetite for such an offering. In 2020 despite the disruptions from the pandemic and its economic fallout, Iroquois Valley saw record levels of new investment. More than 130 new investors — nearly half of them nonaccredited retail investors — committed more than $14 million. Not only that, but our land holdings grew by 10% and our stock price grew to $618, steadily growing from $260 in 2008, proving that the value of organic farmland continues to grow.

Would our number of shareholders have grown in 2020 had we not expanded our offering? Perhaps. But because we saw the powerful value of bringing retail investors into the fold, Iroquois Valley — and its investors — were able to make a much greater impact in this vital quest to grow organic land in the United States.

The mission — and opportunity — is even greater as the effects of climate change become more apparent.

As David Miller, Iroquois Valley’s co-founder and CEO, often says: “There’s no liquidity on a dead planet.”

Restoring the Agricultural Richness of Pembroke

Located one hour south of Chicago, the Pembroke Township in Illinois was once home to the largest Black farming community north of the Mason-Dixon line. Today, less than 50% of this land is owned by descendants of the farming families. Iroquois Valley, in partnership with Black Oaks Center, Savanna Institute, Conservation Fund, Food Finance Institute, and Fresh Taste, was awarded a Conservation Collaboration Grant in 2020 to support this farming community with the financial and technical resources necessary to expand and diversify the region’s agroforestry production. 

As part of this grant, Black Oaks Center recently hosted an Open House for all Pembroke landowners to attend and learn more about federal funding opportunities. Present at the event were Conservation Fund, Savanna Institute, Iroquois Valley, and Renewable Pembroke. The Farm Service Agency (FSA) was also available to sign up landowners for FSA programs – their first step in accessing National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) services. John Steven Bianucci, Iroquois Valley’s Director of Conservation, reported that over 25 landowners registered with the FSA. 

Overall, the event was a big success, increasing the momentum for Pembroke farming.

5 Things We Must Do To Improve the U.S. Healthcare System

Shifting to organic practices on a large scale has enormous potential to regenerate soils, ecosystems, rural economies, our food system, and so much more.”

Dr. Stephen Rivard

Authority Magazine, a Medium publication, is devoted to sharing interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable. As a part of Authority Magazine’s interview series called “5 Things We Must Do To Improve the U.S. Healthcare System”, Luke Kervin, Co-Founder of PatientPop, had the pleasure to interview Dr. Stephen Rivard, co-founder of Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT. You can read the article below or view it on the original site here.

A native of rural Illinois with strong family ties to agriculture, Dr. Stephen Rivard practiced emergency medicine for 26 years, where he observed an increase in the number of patients seeking treatment for diet and environment-related illnesses. These experiences motivated Dr. Rivard’s interest in food as medicine and, in 2007, Dr. Rivard and his lifelong friend Dave Miller founded Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT, a Best for the World B Corp and public benefit corporation, to provide land security to organic farmers. With the support of over 600 impact investors, Iroquois Valley has built a portfolio that includes nearly 100 farmland investments, impacting over 17,000 acres of farmland across 15 states and representing $70 million in assets.

Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Before we dive into our interview, our readers would like to get to know you a bit. Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

My father died at age 42 from a heart attack. This destabilizing event influenced my decision to enter medicine. It’s hard to imagine now, but emergency medicine was a new field when I graduated from medical school. As a new doctor, the opportunity to be part of an emerging, highly integrative field was appealing. Because I had so many varied interests, emergency medicine felt like the best fit.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

In the ER, we were exposed to many extraordinary and often tragic events. Two pivotal experiences for me involved agrichemicals: on one occasion, I cared for a 4-year-old boy who was playing in his dad’s shed and spilled a bottle of an organophosphate insecticide on himself. The child died of heart and lung failure. On another occasion, a farmer arrived at the hospital with exposure to the same insecticide when he was in the field spraying. Thankfully, the farmer survived this experience, but he spent many days in the ICU on a ventilator. These were my first encounters with agrichemicals and their negative impact on human health. I was astonished that these same chemicals are widespread in our food system and used to grow food.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I made the mistake of underestimating one of my patients. I assumed my 93-year-old patient would be too weak to get herself up on a gurney. I offered my assistance, but she stepped up on the stool and hopped onto the bed. Surprised, I said with a smile that she reminded me of my mother.

“How old is your mother?” she asked. I responded that my mom is 78 years old.

“Oh, to be 78 again,” she said. It was a lesson to not judge what a person is capable of doing and to enjoy your life at every age. In fact, I am in the process of retiring from practicing medicine. I’m looking forward to being even more involved with Iroquois Valley. For this next stage of my life, I plan to participate in public-facing advocacy to bring awareness to the link between food and health.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

I often say that “anything worth doing is worth doing badly,” to convey that perfection should not get in the way of progress. It can be discouraging to be a beginner at something and to be out of your element. For example, I was terrible when I started learning piano, and I also sounded silly when I started learning French. We have to remember that mistakes are a part of life and that it takes courage to get going.

When my fellow co-founder Dave Miller and I started Iroquois Valley, I knew nothing about finance, but I knew what I’d seen practicing medicine and that something needed to be done about the converging food and health crises. Dave’s experience in finance made our partnership successful. I’m proud of how far the company has come and for the learning we did along the way.

How would you define an “excellent healthcare provider”?

A knowledgeable doctor is valuable, and coupled with empathy, that doctor is invaluable. It’s important that healthcare practitioners listen to their patients and treat their patients as holistically as possible.

What are your favorite books, podcasts, or resources that inspire you to be a better healthcare leader? Can you explain why you like them?

There is a direct connection between the book Silent Spring by Rachel Carson and my work at Iroquois Valley. Carson concluded that DDT and other pesticides had irrevocably harmed ecosystems and contaminated our food supply. Another book that influenced me is Living Downstream by cancer survivor and ecologist Dr. Sandra Steingraber. Iroquois Valley is uncompromising in our support of organic farmers because they don’t use the harmful chemicals that are so common in the industry. It’s important for our healthcare leaders to understand the link between how we farm and human health.

Are you working on any exciting new projects now? How do you think that will help people?

Iroquois Valley is developing an agroforestry and integrated crop farming campus at Rock Creek Farms in Will County, Illinois. This showcase farm will be open to the public and is about 50 miles outside of Chicago.

For the most part, crop farmers in the Midwest operate in monocultures of corn, beans, and wheat. At Rock Creek, we are practicing agroforestry at scale to integrate annual and perennial crops; for example, interplanting native fruit trees with alfalfa hay. Alley cropping and silvopasture are being incorporated along with riparian buffers and wind breaks. We are restoring wetlands to increase biodiversity and have planted over 10,000 trees. Food will be sold on the farm to feed and educate the local community. It is a multi-stakeholder venture involving Savanna Institute, the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, Rodale Institute, Village Farmstand, Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, and Healing Soils Foundation. Prairie Fruits currently sells its cheese throughout the Chicago foodshed as well as various sweetgreen locations. Rock Creek can support farms in our network and in the region to expand their businesses.

At Rock Creek, we will also conduct soil testing and nutrient density testing on food grown at this campus. I’m troubled by studies that show declines in food’s nutritional quality. Between climate change and widespread practices in agriculture that degrade soil health, I feel that some of the most powerful work I can be engaged in is to restore soil health through organic and regenerative practices. Doing this work at Rock Creek will hopefully produce more data points demonstrating that healthy soils grow healthy foods that contribute to the overall health of people.

Ok, thank you for that. Let’s now jump to the main focus of our interview. According to this study cited by Newsweek, the US healthcare system is ranked as the worst among high income nations. This seems shocking. Can you share with us 3–5 reasons why you think the US is ranked so poorly?

This actually does not shock me at all. During my years in the ER, I noticed a disturbing trend toward poorer health. I sometimes feel that we are sicker now as a population than we were when I first began practicing medicine.

Think about this:

  • Food allergies have increased.
  • Obesity is a significant health concern in America. It’s often accompanied with heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes and produces costly medical issues. In fact, when I first started practicing medicine, we referred to Type 2 diabetes as Adult Onset Diabetes because it occurred so rarely in children and teenagers. That’s changed, too.
  • Chronic inflammation, exacerbated by a diet of conventionally grown foods, can lead to obesity, diabetes, stress, mental health problems, and other negative health outcomes that are avoidable.
  • Neurologic diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s are more common, too.
  • Colorectal cancer is far more common, especially in people under 50. It’s been linked to chronic inflammation, declines in gut health, and diet, according to the National Cancer Institute.

The more I studied, the more aware I became aware that many of our medical issues are food related. At the same time, the costs of healthcare have skyrocketed. My reasoning tells me that these trends are not sustainable — we need to change our approach to healthcare, and I believe we should start with food and prevention.

As a “healthcare insider”, If you had the power to make a change, can you share 5 changes that need to be made to improve the overall US healthcare system? Please share a story or example for each.

1) Provide everyone in the U.S., especially children, with access to high-quality, organic food. Currently, only 1% of US farmland is organic. Shifting to organic practices on a large scale has enormous potential to regenerate soils, ecosystems, rural economies, our food system, and so much more.

2) Invest in nutrition education throughout medical school. When I was in medical school, we spent no time learning about the way food interacts with health. Since then, there have been some improvements, but in my opinion, we have made surprisingly little progress integrating nutrition into medicine. Pharmaceuticals are undoubtedly important and valuable in medicine, but I might spend a proportionate amount of time on food as both prevention and treatment, where applicable.

3) Clean our water. Water is critical to life on this planet, and I am incredibly concerned about pollution, including runoff from agriculture. Each year the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico grows, largely from fertilizers used on conventional farms throughout the Mississippi River watershed. For the sake of the planet and all of us living on it, this cannot continue.

4) Improve air quality. Respiratory illnesses are also on the rise, and they are exacerbated by wildfires fueled by climate change. In addition, inner city residents have higher rates of respiratory diseases, often due to their proximity to the pollution from industry and highways. We have a lot to learn about what the long-term effects COVID-19 will have on respiratory health. As I’ve indicated, I firmly believe that preventing disease is much better and more cost effective than surgical or other kinds of post-medical interventions.

5) Educate. We have to change a lot of people’s minds about how we farm, and the more hard science we have, the better. As mentioned, we are working on a Midwest showcase farm outside Chicago to demonstrate and teach best-practice organic farming methods that includes agroforestry integration. In addition, testing will be conducted to provide more data points on the benefits of farming in these ways.

What concrete steps would have to be done to actually manifest these changes? What can a) individuals, b) corporations, c) communities and d) leaders do to help?

a) Individuals: Buy organic food directly from farmers or at a trusted grocery store like Village Farmstand in Evanston, Ill. Many farmers in the Iroquois Valley network also sell directly to consumers through their websites. Get educated about organic farming. The Rodale Institute farm systems trial is a landmark, nearly 40-year comparison of conventional versus organic production. The Organic Farming Research Foundation has an organic for climate resilience campaign outlining the benefits of organic farming. Individuals can also support sustainable causes and organizations through their purchasing power, by donating time and money, and through investing in companies like Iroquois Valley whose work supports the future.

b) Corporations: Adopting responsible corporate practices more widely is a step towards the accountability we need from businesses. Iroquois Valley is a proud certified B Corp and public benefit corporation. This means that we have a corporate structure that supports social, environmental, and financial impact. We have been recognized for our impacts, and we have been named a Best for the World B Corp for multiple years. As a B Corp, we are required to consistently verify our impacts through a rigorous assessment process. We also report on the ways we are creating public benefit — in our case, to enable the production of healthy food, restore soils, and improve water quality by providing secure and sustainable farmland tenure. We believe that for-profit organizations need to be accountable to all stakeholders, including people and the planet.

c) Communities: Get educated and involved in local initiatives. For example, Iroquois Valley is in partnership with Black Oaks Center in Pembroke Township, which is a historically Black farming community south of Chicago. The township came together to develop a long-term sustainability plan prioritizing native ecosystem restoration, sustainable agriculture, and many health-giving quality-of-life measures. I’m inspired by this creative community-building.

d) Leaders: I would urge political leaders to look at the total long-term costs and impacts of conventional agriculture on human and planetary health. A particular concern for me is glyphosate (also known as Roundup), and in the U.S. we use over one million tons each growing season. Glyphosate has been linked to cancer and numerous states and international countries have limited or banned the herbicide. The pursuit of making food affordable through the industrial food model has come at a high cost.

The COVID-19 pandemic has put intense pressure on the American healthcare system, leaving some hospital systems at a complete loss as to how to handle this crisis. Can you share with us examples of where we’ve seen the U.S. healthcare system struggle? How do you think we can correct these issues moving forward?

I am not a virologist and don’t pretend to know the many intricacies of this specific disease. COVID-19 does appear to act differently from many of the viral diseases we have encountered in prior years. I’m also not a policymaker. It’s clear to me that this pandemic revealed how fragile many of our systems are, including healthcare.

How do you think we can address the problem of physician shortages?

There are many factors to consider, including the growing demand for healthcare. I believe that food — grown organically in healthy soils — is medicine. I think starting there and focusing on preventative medicine will be especially important moving forward.

How do you think we can address the issue of physician diversity?

I’m struck by how much work we have to do in many fields, including medicine. I think the events of the last year have brought racial and social justice issues home in so many ways that they weren’t before. I’m reflecting on the COVID-19 pandemic and its disproportionate impact on communities of color, both in the U.S. and internationally. I’m heartened because I have a sense that we’re approaching these topics more holistically than in other points of history that I’ve lived through. At Iroquois Valley, we participated in two training courses related to diversity, equity, and inclusion this year that I found enormously helpful. One starting point is to acknowledge and interrupt the biases we all have. We need passionate, intelligent, and caring physicians from all walks of life. We must work harder to support physicians of color to enter and thrive in our field.

I’m interested in the interplay between the general healthcare system and the mental health system. Right now, we have two parallel tracks, mental/behavioral health and general health. What are your thoughts about this status quo? What would you suggest to improve this?

Mental health is not my area of medical expertise. I have been following recent studies on the human gut microbiome that have shown a link between gut health and mental health. It is reasonable to believe that improving the way we eat could play a role in improving mental health.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I believe in the power of a grassroots movement. Iroquois Valley’s CEO Dave Miller and I started this work because we believe it is how we could make the most difference in the world. We are structured where accredited and non-accredited investors may support this movement with a minimum equity investment of roughly $10,000.

Organic farming is a way to restore health back to the planet. In addition, it can increase the flow of healthy and nutritious food that can help us prevent illness, shifting our healthcare system from reactive to preventative.

How can our readers further follow your work online?

For more information on Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT and its investment options, visit www.iroquoisvalley.com. You may sign up for our newsletter there and find links to our social media channels.

Thank you so much for these insights! This was very inspirational and we wish you continued success in your great work.

A Conversation with Chicory Wealth

Chicory Wealth, one of the registered investment advisors in our financial advisor network, recently hosted Alex Mackay, our VP, Investor Relations, for a conversation about investment opportunities at Iroquois Valley. We would highly recommend the webinar to anyone interested in a comprehensive overview of what we do. Alex walks through our Pitch Deck and shares stories about three of the farms in our portfolio

“We’re part of the solution: #fornature”: Celebrating the International Day for Biodiversity

“Biodiversity—the variation of life on Earth—is essential to healthy ecosystems and serves as nature’s own system of checks and balances.”

Rodale Institute

On May 22nd, the U.N.-sponsored International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB) was celebrated around the world. Events included visual art shows in the U.S., biodiversity presentations in Portugal, and gardening workshops in South Africa. The IDB reminds us that biodiversity is the solution to several sustainable development challenges, including food security, climate change, and health issues. 

Here at Iroquois Valley, we’re pleased to celebrate the biodiversity that organic farming encourages. Organic farming seeks to mirror nature and cultivates a diverse mix of microorganisms, plants, and animals on the land. This contrasts conventional farming practices, which eliminate biodiversity through the widespread use of toxic chemicals and monoculture cropping systems. Through crop rotations, cover crops, and soil amendments (like compost), organic farmers are transitioning land from degraded soil into a world teeming with a variety of organisms.

Photo Credit: Sharing Our Roots, a Minnesota-based farm in the Iroquois Valley portfolio

The Promises & Perils of Regenerative Agriculture

Photo by Cornelia Li

One of the most common questions we get asked is whether we differentiate between regenerative agriculture and organic agriculture when financing our farms. Our standard response is that the term “regenerative agriculture” is still in development and does not have a definition that is agreed upon across the industry. In contrast, we believe the USDA Organic certification offers a clear and comprehensive basis for farmers to participate and be distinguished in the marketplace. 

That being said, we frequently work with farmers pursuing further certification that fit their operations, including Regenerative Organic Certification. Our portfolio currently includes farms that are Bee Better certified, Real Organic Project certified, and distinguished as a Savory Hub. Other farms in the portfolio are inspired by Biodynamic principles and are exploring that certification as well. 

Regenerative Agriculture Needs a Reckoning” by Joe Fassler is a thought-provoking article that discusses the lack of consensus on what constitutes regenerative agriculture and more. One particularly profound passage is highlighted below. We’d highly recommend reading through the entire article as Fassler considers the essence of regenerative agriculture and the social movements it impacts.

Make no mistake: In this [the conversation of defining “regenerative”], something crucial is being negotiated. The debate over what regenerative agriculture means, and who gets to decide, spills over into the issues we care most about. It touches on our changing relationship to science and technology, on access and antitrust reform, on workers’ rights and racial injustice, on conceptions of the natural world and our place in it. It’s a conversation that forces you to draw a bigger circle, only to realize that circle isn’t big enough.  

Let’s say, at heart, everyone agrees on one thing: Regenerative agriculture means farming in a way that makes the whole world better. If that’s the case, maybe the most telling thing isn’t your attitude on cover cropping or rotational grazing. Maybe the most telling thing is how large you think the whole is, and who and what gets to benefit from inclusion in it.

Worried about inflation? Invest in organic farmland

“Now is a very good time to invest in one of human civilization’s oldest and most reliable sources of wealth… farmland.” 

Justin Anderson, Yahoo Finance

Rising fear of inflation is causing many investors to direct their money towards bonds or alternative asset classes instead of the stock market. Despite investors’ concerns, the Federal Reserve continues to hold rates steady, calling any inflation increases “transitory” amid the government stimulus. 

For investors interested in hedging against periods of inflation, farmland is an exceptional asset to diversify an investment portfolio. As the price of consumer goods rises, the price of commodities (such as food) typically rises as well. Food is necessary for survival, so an increase in prices will not affect demand compared to non-essential consumer goods. An increase in the price of food is often accompanied by an increase in the value of farmland — thus making now a prime time to invest in one of our country’s most valuable assets

Although portfolio diversification and the financial upside of farmland investment are at the forefront of our investors’ minds, Iroquois Valley investors are equally concerned with supporting independent farmers, healthy food production, and environmental improvement. When you invest in Iroquois Valley, you are partnering alongside 500+ mission-driven investors working to provide organic farmers with land security and financing. Join us as we invest in the health of our planet, our soil, and our people. 

Events

“We’re part of the solution: #fornature”: Celebrating the International Day for Biodiversity

May 24, 2021
On May 22nd, the U.N.-sponsored International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB) was celebrated around the world. The IDB reminds us that biodiversity is the solution to several sustainable development challenges, including food security, climate change, and health issues.

News

Iroquois Valley recognized as 2021 Best for the World B Corp

August 18, 2021
Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT, PBC is proud to announce our recognition as a Best for the World B Corp: Governance for 2021. This award honors Iroquois Valley for our exemplary governance and commitment to long-term stakeholder-minded business practices.

What We're Reading

Iroquois Valley joins Will County, IL farm alliance to improve soil health, water quality and local economies

August 20, 2021
We need a regional agricultural food, nutrition and conservation business plan that incentivizes farmers to continue producing economic, environmental and social benefits for another 100 years.  

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